Blogger seeks photos of Tati-You County Fine Chemical Factory in Zhuzhou City, China

On the back of the Solvay sodium fluoride bags that the City of Durango has sitting on a pallet at its Water Treatment Plant, it says “Made in China” under the name Shanghai Mintchem Development Co., Ltd.

This blogger is asking for help in finding photography or information about the You County Fine Chemical Plant or the Tati Fluoride Salts Plant in the Zhuzhou City/Hunan, China.

Here’s a related document with a laboratory analysis done by Underwriters Laboratories that was requested by Shanghai Mintchem Development Co., Ltd regarding their sodium fluoride powder.

A vote on whether or not to end the sodium fluoridation of the drinking water by residents of the City of Durango might occur this April if the City Council decides not to preemptively end the program on its own. The vote would follow a successful petition drive by a group that calls themselves Clean Water Durango at www.cleanwaterdurango.org.

Thanks!

Sodium Fluoride bag, backside

This is the backside of a Solvay brand sodium fluoride bag at the City of Durango’s Water Treatment Plant.

Sodium fluoride bags

These bags of sodium fluoride sit on a pallet at the City of Durango’s Water Treatment Plant.

City’s $34,500 dollar per year sodium fluoride program to be subject of public hearing Monday

The City of Durango is having a public hearing about its policy of dosing the municipal drinking water with sodium fluoride on Monday, January 30th at 5:00 p.m. in the City Council chambers.

These bags of Solvay brand sodium fluoride sit on a pallet at the City of Durango's Water Treatment Plant in January, 2017.

These bags of Solvay brand sodium fluoride sit on a pallet at the City of Durango’s Water Treatment Plant in January, 2017.

Jim Forleo, an opponent of Durango’s fluoridation program, obtained information from the City of Durango through an open records request that details the expenses that the City incurs each year with the sodium fluoridation program. According to Forleo:

“The cost of fluoridation:
Sodium Fluoride- $16,000
Laboratory analysis $ 7,000
Feed repair parts and materials $1500
Labor $10,000
Total——————$34,500. per year

Volumizer machine-$30,000 fully depreciated, 15years old.

New machine is $30,000,” wrote Forleo.

This blogger was given a tour of Durango’s Water Treatment Plant last Friday.


Sodium fluoride bags say that they are made in China

On the back of the Solvay sodium fluoride bags that the City of Durango has sitting on a pallet in its water treatment plant, it says, “Made in China.”

One of the things that I’ve been trying to learn more about afterwards is the chemical plant in China where the sodium fluoride is made. On the back of the sodium fluoride bag is the name Shanghai Mintchem Development Co., Ltd. A search for that name on all internet web browsers produces very little information. One document that I did find was a report by Underwriter Laboratories Inc. on the sodium fluoride product, which a municipality in Utah has as a PDF document.

This report talks about a laboratory analysis of the sodium fluoride that’s produced at the request of Shanghai Mintchem Development Co., Ltd. It is later packaged and then sold to the City of Durango under the Solvay brand, which has a corporate office in Houston, Texas.

Beyond this report, there are very few online mentions of the plant, which I found several names for. The names I came up with were Tati-You County Fine Chemical Factory in Zhozhou City, China. I also found Youxian XinXing Fine Chemical Plant at 75, Chenguang Industrial Rd in Huaihua, Hunan. Another name that was mentioned was Tati Fluoride Salts Plant.

I was unable to locate any related photos from Google Earth or mapping websites online. Please email me if you are able to find pictures of the sodium fluoride plant in Hunan, China. Thanks!

This is the back of a Solvay brand sodium fluoride bag at the City of Durango's Water Treatment plant in January, 2017.

This is the back of a Solvay brand sodium fluoride bag at the City of Durango’s Water Treatment plant in January, 2017.

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How to get jailed for illegally riding your bike in the City of Durango’s Oxbow Preserve

Since bikes have been outlawed in the new Oxbow Preserve, it’s important to know the consequences for riding your bike there in the event that law enforcement catches you.

This is the entrance to the Oxbow Preserve.

This is the entrance to the Oxbow Preserve.

Bikes were criminalized in the City’s new Oxbow Preserve after Natural Lands Preservation Advisory Board members Steve Whiteman and Paul Wilbert suggested it. The ban was part of a plan to allow the perimeter trail to be open as long as possible throughout the year, with river flows permitting. The Natural Lands Board and the City Council, in turn, voted to approve this bike ban as part of the Oxbow Park and Preserve Management Plan in 2016.

This blogger asked two local officials to help describe what happens when you get busted for riding your bike in the Preserve.

Paula Liermann, the Court Administrator for the Durango Municipal Court described what would happen if a bicyclist trespassed in the Preserve. An example of an additional violation would be if a bicyclist jumps the fence or the gate with their bike during a City-imposed closure while the land in the Preserve is inundated with water due to spring run off:

“There are no scheduled fines for the charge of Trespass; it should be a required court appearance and subject to the $26 in court costs ($18 costs and $8 surcharge),” said Liermann. “The judge would decide whether the fact that the property is closed might warrant additional fees. If the individual requests a deferred judgment, there would be an additional $25 deferred fee as the case stays open for the 90 or 120-day time period to ensure that no similar violations occur. Successful completion would result in the plea being withdrawn and dismissal of the case.”

Former Durango Police Department Chief Jim Spratlen.

Former Durango Police Department Chief Jim Spratlen.

Also, you might be wondering what happens if you don’t pay the fine for trespass. Here’s a quick explanation from Durango’s former Police Chief Jim Spratlen:

“If they do not pay they get a warrant for their arrest and get to go to jail,” said Spratlen.

“Paula, can you help us in fines and costs? Also the court cost etc. please.”

Here’s Liermann, again, with more details on what happens when you get to go to jail:

“As the Chief stated, those who willfully fail to pay for a bike or dog citation will eventually be subject to a bench warrant w/ a $50 warrant fee assessed upon arrest, in addition to all scheduled fines/fees,” said Liermann.



Removal of sodium fluoride from Durango’s drinking water eligible for April’s election ballot

A ballot initiative petition drive seeking to allow Durango voters to decide if the City should discontinue the dosing of its drinking water with sodium fluoride was successful in gaining enough signatures by the deadline, according to its lead organizer.

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Sodium fluoride is a compulsory medication that City Council members think that residents should be required to be treated with.

Jim Forleo, a local chiropractor who organized the petitioner’s committee and helped write the language of the ordinance, said Friday that the petitioners got enough signatures to put the question to voters on the ballot in April.

“By 4pm today, we got it on the ballot! We get the official word on Monday, but the city clerk stopped counting at 4pm today and said we had enough signatures,” said Forleo. “Now we have to get people to vote it out!”

Forleo estimated that the petitioner’s committee collected 800 signatures by the deadline on Friday.

By Monday afternoon, the Durango City Clerk’s office was still counting the valid signatures on the petitions, according to Deputy City Clerk Chris Harlow.

“We are in the process of completing the audit of the petitions that were turned in by the committee, but by an unofficial calculation, there are more than enough signatures to put the issue on the ballot,” said Harlow. “At last count, there were 636 valid signatures.”

The number of valid signatures needed to qualify the ordinance for appearing on the April ballot is 593, said Harlow.

While the City Council could decide within 30 days if they will adopt the ordinance, the alternative will be that voters will decide in an election in April.

Inspiration to sign the petition came for many voters, even after The Durango Herald and a City Councilor publicly asked voters to avoid signing, and to not give themselves a say in whether or not they are given compulsory medication through the drinking water.

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The sodium fluoride in Durango’s water is toxic if taken internally, according to its manufacturer, as well as the EPA.

Sodium fluoride is a chemical that the City of Durango puts in the city’s drinking water for the purpose of reducing people’s dental cavities. The product is also labeled as poisonous by its manufacturer, Solvay, as well as the EPA, if taken internally. The chemical was previously used as an ingredient in rodent poisons and insecticides such as D-Con and Ratak.

Residents of Durango have repeatedly been asking city officials to discontinue the dosing of its drinking water, starting in 1957, then in 2005, again in 2009, and most recently last year by Forleo and others. Durango City Council chose to instead side with arguments presented by the Colorado Health Department, San Juan Basin Health Department and the American Dental Association.

To read a PDF document of the ordinance that would prevent city officials from putting this poison in our drinking water, CLICK HERE.